Got a drinking problem? Try kudzu

The plant is drought tolerant and frosts kill only the aboveground parts of the vine. The roots are also resistant to herbicides and it can take 3–10 years of repeated treatments with herbicides before the nutrient reserves of the roots are exhausted. Various herbs and combinations of herbs are reported to be effective in reducing cravings, but in general, no studies have proven their effectiveness. Various herbs and combinations of herbs are reported to be effective in reducing cravings, but in general, no studies have been conducted to prove their effectiveness.

While it does not completely eliminate drinking, it is clearly effective in significantly reducing intake, which offers individuals an opportunity to engage in more responsible drinking patterns. As a safe, over-the-counter preparation, kudzu may be used alone in initial attempts to curb alcohol consumption, but it may also become a useful adjunct to the currently available prescription medications. This latter scenario might very well reduce alcohol cravings naturally permit the use of lower doses of prescription medications and thus reduce the incidence of side effects. Furthermore, because kudzu extract exerts its beneficial effects within hours of the first dose, it could be administered along with a prescription medication and provide “coverage” until the other medication begins to work. But kudzu has not always been known as a hangover remedy–it’s also a traditional treatment for alcoholism.

Neurobiology of Chinese Herb Medicine

Prior studies of its antidipsotropic effect have focused on taste-aversion, alterations in alcohol metabolism or effects on neurotransmitters. Overstreet et al.’s study provides cursory evidence that a taste aversion mechanism is not likely. Increases in 5-HIAL have been shown to be correlated with decreased alcohol consumption in hamsters (Keung et al., 1995). Kudzu’s alteration of alcohol consumption may be through direct effects at brain benzodiazepine receptors on the GABAA complex. All of the above mentioned mechanisms, with the exception of a disulfiram-like one, require repeated administration and time to develop. Since consuming alcohol while taking kudzu extract is not aversive, another explanation is necessary to account for the extremely fast onset of action observed in the present study. The most obvious is one that involves alcohol pharmacokinetics.

kudzu root for alcohol cravings

The researchers next plan to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging to examine the effects of kudzu on how quickly alcohol gets into the brain. But before Penetar and Lukas­—a Professor of Psychiatry at HMS—could endorse kudzu, they needed to be sure that it did not simply make individuals experience the same level https://ecosoberhouse.com/ of intoxication with half as much alcohol. If that were the case, taking the drug would help people get drunk faster rather than helping them drink less. Kudzu vine forms new roots from stem nodes touching the ground. It produces large numbers of seeds that are disseminated by animals, especially birds.

Treatment guidelines according to the main patterns of disharmony

The researchers found that these types of responses were not intensified if participants had taken kudzu, suggesting that the drug does not work by increasing the intensity or duration of alcohol’s effects. Kudzu, an ever-expanding plant considered a pest in much of the South, appears to contain a compound that can be effective in reducing alcohol intake among humans. Currently, commonly prescribed anti-drinking drugs such as disulfiram , naltrexone , and acamprosate , cause several side effects.

Kudzu Does Not Heighten Intoxication News – Harvard Crimson

Kudzu Does Not Heighten Intoxication News.

Posted: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 08:00:00 GMT [source]